Election 2020 #1 (Under Construction)

Here we are in another Presidential election cycle. It seems like only 3 years since we elected our last President. During the 2015-2016 Presidential election cycle, I had a different title for every article. This time, I’m not going to be as creative (or confusing, depending upon your point of view). Each new post will simply the next in a series with a new number.

The Democrats …

On October 15, 2019, the night of the fourth Democratic National Debate, there were 19 major [1] Democratic candidates in the race to be the 2020 Presidential Nominee. Since the debate two candidates have dropped out … Tim Ryan on October 24th and Beto O’Rourke on November 1st. On November 7th, Michael Bloomberg filed for the Alabama democratic presidential primary in order to meet that state’s deadline. On November 12th, he filed in Arkansas presumably for the same reason. In doing so, he has joined the game … bringing the the number of back up to 20.20 Candidates with 12 Highlighted B as of 7-Nov-2019

Deval Patrick 75 x 75

On November 11th, former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick resumed making noises about throwing his hat into the ring. He has not yet taken any definitive action.

Twelve candidates (highlighted above) qualified for the October 15th debate … Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Julian Castro, Tulsi Gabbard, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O’Rourke, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Elizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang.

In this first installment of the series, I shall not focus on all of the positions of all of the candidates. Instead, I want to discuss the most prominent concerns, I shall refer to individual candidates only when a particular plan is connected to one or two candidates.

Healthcare

Coverage

While there are minor differences and nuances among the candidates proposing each, there seem to be two major ideas about how to assure universal healthcare in the United States:

  1. Medicare for All
    To most of us who are already signed up for Medicare, the term “Medicare for All” doesn’t do justice to S.1129 — 116th Congress (2019-2020), the bill introduced by Senator Bernie Sanders. [2]  When we hear the term “Medicare”, we think of Medicare A and B. Until we apply for Medicare (or listen to the onslaught of Medicare commercials on TV at this time of year), most of us don’t know that:
     
        a. Medicare A covers only about 80% of medical costs.
     
        b. Medicare B isn’t free. One must pay for part of Medicare B.
            Most of us have the cost deducted from our Social Security
            checks.
     
        c. Medicare A and B do not cover vision, dental care, or drugs.
            Medicare Advantage (or Medicare C) plans usually cover
            vision and drugs at an additional cost. Medicare D also covers
            drugs. Dental coverage requires yet another plan.
     
        d. Medicare Advantage plans usually require copays.
     
    S.1129 covers !@#
  2. Restore, improve, and expand the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.Most

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Doctor Visits and Hospital Costs

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Prescription Drug Costs

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The Republicans …

Not surprisingly, there were not as many candidates for the Republican nomination.

4 Candidates as of 8-Oct-2019

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… And 35 Senators

Voters will be deciding on 35 Senate seats in 2020. Currently, Republicans hold 23 of those seats and Democrats hold 12. Three Republicans … Johnny Isakson of Georgia, Pat Roberts of Kansas, Lamar Alexander of Tennessee … and one Democrat … Tom Udall of New Mexico … are not seeking re-election.35 by Party 3 x 11
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End Notes
  1. As of October 21, 2019, there are 904 candidates who filed to run, including:
     
            *  286 Democratic candidates
            *  133 Republican candidates
            *    41 Libertarian candidates
            *    18 Green candidates 
     
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  2. The bill is co-sponsored by Senators Tammy Baldwin, Richard Blumenthal, Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Patrick Leahy, Ed Markey, Jeff Merkley, Brian Schatz, Tom Udall, Elizabeth Warren, Sheldon Whitehouse, Mazie Hirono, and Martin Heinrich.
     
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